Introducing the new Banking Reform Clearinghouse

We are pleased to announce the launch of the Golub Center for Finance and Policy’s new Banking Reform Clearinghouse, or BRiC. With the recent passage of the Financial CHOICE Act of 2017 in the U.S. House of Representatives and the current Administration’s interest in amending Dodd-Frank, the potential for banking regulatory reform appears real. Proposals for change have come from all corners both within and outside of government, so GCFP has decided to create an interactive educational tool for researchers, practitioners and the general public to learn more about financial regulatory reform and stay abreast of legislative developments.

The tool is not intended to be an exhaustive compilation of all matters involving regulatory reform but more of a directory of information that can help inform the debate on the topic. Through it you can find articles, research papers, speeches, bills, blogs, videos and more compiled from a wide range of reputable sources, each linked to its original site.

The tool presently contains information from five main sources.

  1. The CHOICE Act – this section provides an overview of certain provisions in the bill and links to a summary of the bill.
  2. The Treasury Report – this section focuses on some of the key recommendations in Treasury’s June 12th report and allows you to jump to specific recommendation sections based on selected topics.
  3. Federal Reserve – here we look at statements, speeches and research reports from the Board of Governors and the 12 Federal Reserve Banks.
  4. Think Tanks/Academia – this includes articles, research papers, blogs, videos and policy letters from think tanks and other academic institutions.
  5. Other Congressional Proposals – these are proposals pending in either the House of Representatives or Senate that address key aspects of regulatory reform.

When you launch the tool, you can pick whether to start your search by issue area (e.g., Volcker Rule, CFPB, etc.) or source (e.g., Congress, Think Tanks, etc.). Since the GCFP does not explicitly or implicitly make or endorse specific policy recommendations, each section is organized with the most recent or relevant links appearing first. We’ve taken care to include links from authors and institutions from both sides of the regulatory reform spectrum. While it would be practically impossible to build and maintain an exhaustive database of work related to regulatory reform, we will continue to update the tool to include new content from the Fed, think tanks, academia and Congress as it becomes available. For more information about our search methodology, please click here.

In developing this tool, GCFP is seeking to enhance official and public understanding of some of the key issues being debated in the context of Dodd-Frank reform. We hope you find it to be of use. If you have suggestions for further development of tool, feel free to contact us.